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K . ART Moments

Posted: 05 Jun 2011 07:47 PM PDT
artwork: Edward Burne-Jones - 'Laus Veneris' - This painting captures many aspects of the Aesthetic Movement - the depiction of languorous females in flowing dresses, the themes of music and legend, and an admiration for medieval manuscripts and tapestry. - Image : V&A Museum, London

LONDON - The exhibition is arranged in four main chronological sections, charting the development of the Aesthetic Movement in art and design through the decades from the 1860s to the 1890s. As well as paintings, prints and drawings, the show will include examples of all the 'artistic' decorative arts, together with drawings, designs and photographs, as well as portraits, fashionable dress and jewellery of the era. Literary life will be represented by some of the most beautiful books of the day, whilst a number of set-pieces reveal the visual world of the Aesthetes, evoking the kind of rooms and ensembles of exquisite objects through which they expressed their sensibilities. On view through 17 July at the V&A Museum.


The search for new beauty 1860s

In the 1860s the new and exciting 'Cult of Beauty' united, for a while at least, romantic bohemians such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti (and his younger Pre-Raphaelite followers William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones), maverick figures such as James McNeill Whistler, then fresh from Paris and full of 'dangerous' French ideas about modern painting, and the 'Olympians' - the painters of grand classical subjects who belonged to the circle of  Frederic Leighton and G.F.Watts. Choosing unconventional models, such as Rossetti's muse Lizzie Siddal or Leighton's sultry favourite 'La Nanna', these painters created entirely new types of female beauty. Rossetti and his friends were also the first to attempt to realise their imaginative world in the creation of 'artistic' furniture and the decoration of rooms. In this period, artists' houses and their extravagant lifestyles became the object of public fascination and sparked a revolution in the architecture and interior decoration of houses that led to a widespread recognition of the need for beauty in everyday life.

artwork: Dante Gabriel Rossetti  - 'Bocca Baciata',1859 - Oil on panel (c) Museum of Fine Arts, Boston . . Gift of James Lawrence


Art for Arts Sake. .1860s-1870s


artwork: Frederick Sandys - 'Proud Maisie', 1868 Pencil and crayon on paper. - Collection of the V&A Museum no. P.7-1933 Given by Mr H.C. CoaksOne of the most important examples of the mutual influence between artists and designers is to be found in the startling collaborations between James McNeill Whistler and the architect E.W.Godwin who designed the painter's studio, The White House, and created some of the most innovative furniture of the day. Characterized equally by elegance and eccentricity, Whistler and Godwin's work drew upon influences as diverse as ancient Greek art and the Japanese prints and other artifacts  just beginning to arrive in Europe.

In the 1870s, the leading Aesthetic artists, Whistler, Leighton, Watts, Albert Moore and Burne-Jones evolved a new kind of self-consciously exquisite painting in which mood, colour harmony and beauty of form were all, and subject played little or no part. The opening of the Grosvenor Gallery (with its famous 'greenery-yallery' walls) in 1877 at last gave the Aesthetic painters a fashionable and glamorous showcase for their much-discussed art. But the decade closed with intense controversy exemplified by the critic John Ruskin's savage attack on Whistler, which prompted the painter's spirited defense of the ideals of 'Art for Art's Sake' in his writings and by the staging of his own exhibitions.

Late-flowering beauty..1880s-1890s

Oscar Wilde, the first celebrity style-guru, invented a brilliant pose of 'poetic intensity', but initially made his name promoting the idea of 'The House Beautiful'. By the 1880s Britain was in the grip of the 'greenery-yallery' Aesthetic Craze, lovingly satirized by Gilbert and Sullivan in their famous comic opera Patience and by the caricaturist George Du Maurier in the pages of Punch.

In the last decade of  Queen Victoria's reign the Aesthetic Movement entered its final, fascinating Decadent phase, characterized by the extraordinary black-and-white drawings of Aubrey Beardsley in The Yellow Book.

The exhibition ends with a superb group of the greatest late Aesthetic paintings, including masterpieces such as Leighton's Bath of Psyche, Moore's Midsummer and Rossetti's final picture The Daydream, shown alongside the sensuous nude figures sculpted in bronze and precious materials by Alfred Gilbert and other brilliant younger exponents of 'The New Sculpture'. Visit the V&A Museum at : www.vam.ac.uk/






 indecorous taste



tartine Gourmand
BOTERO





Pure Sixties, Pure Bailey, a Selling Exhibition at Bonhams in London
Posted: 01 Apr 2011 09:56 PM PDT
artwork: To celebrate 50 years since the start of the swinging sixties (and 50 years since David Bailey started work at Vogue. Bonhams has asked Bailey to put together a selection of his finest images from the decade  Left : Jean Shrimpton, photographed by Bailey in British Vogue; Right: Mick Jagger gelatin silver print, edition 110. Photo: Bonhams.
LONDON.- A selling exhibition of David Bailey's iconic images of the 1960s - the 50th anniversary of a decade that changed our cultural history - will be hosted by Bonhams in New Bond Street. The 'Pure Sixties. Pure Bailey.' exhibition will be on view at Bonhams, 101 New Bond Street, from 7th March – 7th April, 2010. David Bailey's name is an integral part of the 1960s, that dynamic period which created a melting pot of talent drawn from music, fashion, literature, design and cinema. He captured images which remain a pictorial reminder of all that was best about it – new, edgy, exciting, & beautiful.
Thomas Warrender 1708
The Uffizi Gallery In Flor

Posted: 22 Jan 2012 06:11 PM PST
artwork: A mammoth hunt on the wall of the Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc cave in Southern France. These works of art (some as old as 32,000 years and believed to be the oldest in the world) are now brought to life in Werner Herzog's "Cave of Dreams" 3-D movie.


London, England (CNN).- Untouched for 20,000 years, the awe-inspiring Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc cave in Southern France is now brought to life in 3D by visionary German director Werner Herzog. As the camera drops into the cave, to the sounds of eerie chanting, breath-taking scenes of glittering, calcite formations and large halls littered with the bones of now extinct cave bears are not only illuminated but made to seem close enough to touch. Most important are the numerous paintings on the undulating walls of the cave, of animals including rhinoceros, bison, mammoths, lions, hyenas and horses, some painted up to 32,000 years ago and which are so vivid as to seem alive. "Cave of Forgotten Dreams" is Herzog's first foray into 3D filmmaking and he says in this case for format was an obvious choice. "The films I have made so far should not have been made in 3D but I think in this case that it was imperative," he said. "I am still in general skeptical about 3D." His approach has allowed the viewer into Chauvet cave, which was only discovered in 1994 and is otherwise shut off to the public for fear of upsetting its delicate climate and damaging the irreplaceable wall paintings. And for Herzog, the medium also lent itself to the cave's layout: "If you look at the formation of the cave, it's not that there are flat walls and paintings on them; there's a great drama in the formation of wild, undulating walls, and bulges and niches, which were all used and utilized by the artists." Herzog's film was completed in September 2010, only just in time for its debut at the Toronto International Film Festival. It was the first 3-D film to screen at the festival's Bell Lightbox theatre.  It is expected to go on general release in Spring 2011 and will be shown on the History Channel who part-funded it.


ence ~ The Finest Collection Of Renaissance Art In The World
Posted: 20 Jan 2012 05:30 PM PST
artwork: The Uffizi Gallery in Florence. Originally commissioned by Cosimo I, Duke of Florence and the first Grand Duke of Tuscany, it was designed by  Giorgio Vasari in the middle of the 16th century. The gallery was officially opened to the public in 1765.  Almost 2 million visitors every year enjoy its impressive collection of Renaissance art.
The Uffizi Palace is one of the most loved monuments in Florence and contains the world’s leading collection of renaissance art. Originally commissioned by Cosimo I, Duke of Florence and the first Grand Duke of Tuscany, the Uffizi was designed by Giorgio Vasari in the middle of the 16th century. The intention of Cosimo I was to build a palace that could host the thirteen administrative and judicial Magistrature or Uffizi, from which the palace would take its name. Vasari was also responsible for the building, five years later, of an overhead corridor passing above Ponte Vecchio and the Church of Santa Felicità, to link the Uffizi to the Pitti Palace, the new residence of the Medici family, and which provides stunning views of the palace courtyard and Arno river. The building has an unusual and singular horseshoe shape, which opens towards the Arno River. The two floors of the building, rise above a pillared portico that runs along the whole length of the palace. The portico niches contain statues of Florentine dignitaries and artists from the middle Ages to the 19th century. It was Francesco I de' Medici, Cosimo I’s son, who first created an art Gallery on the second floor of the Palazzo degli Uffizi to entertain himself, during his walks, with the collection of paintings, sculptures and arrases belonging to the Medici family. The key point in the history of the Uffizi came in 1737, when the last Medici heiress, Anna Maria Luisa moved to France and signed an agreement that all the Medici artworks were not to be removed from Florence. The gallery had been open to visitors by request since the sixteenth century, and in 1765 it was officially opened to the public. Over the years, the Uffizi has survived wartime bombing, flooding in 1966 and 2007 and a terrorist car bombing (attributed to the Sicilian Mafia) in 1993 which damaged some frescoes in the Niobe room beyond repair. In addition to its galleries, the Uffizi contains teaching facilities, an art restoration laboratory, photographic studio and research center. Rennovations are currently under way on parts of the building, under the “New Uffizi” project. When completed these will increase the gallery space, allow more of the collection to be put on public display and reduce the overcrowding caused by almost 2 million visitors every year. Visit the Uffizi’s website at … http://www.polomuseale.firenze.it/english/musei/uffizi/
artwork: Sandro Botticelli - "Venus", circa 1482 - Tempera on panel - 203 x 314 cm. Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence - Part of the famed Uffizi collection.
The exhibition rooms are composed of over 45 rooms containing about 1,700 paintings, 300 sculptures, 46 tapestries and 14 pieces of furniture and/or ceramics. The Uffizi actually owns about 4,800 works, the remainder are either in storage or on loan to other museums. On the ground floor, is the series of frescoes by Andrea del Castagno as well as an Annunciation by Botticelli (a fresco detached from the church of S. Martino alla Scala). A large staircase, built by Vasari, leads to the second floor, were the Medici theatre once stood. This area now contains the Gabinetto dei Disegni e delle Stampe, an exceptional graphic collection comprising more than 120,000 works, from the 14th to the 20th century. On the third floor are two vestibules, which lead into the galleries and which contain a collection of busts of grand dukes and Roman statues. Three corridors on this floor contain the bulk of the visible collection. The first corridor contains the religious art of the Renaissance and the artworks by Flemish artists. Along the perimeter of the corridor is the Medicean collection of head moulds, on the vaulted ceilings are frescoes representing animals, imaginary monsters, satyrs and the Medicean achievements. The first rooms are dedicated to the art of the 13th and 14th centuries, including “The Madonna d'Ognissanti” by Giotto, “The Maestà di Santa Trinita” by Cimabue and “The Maestà” by Duccio di Buoninsegna. From the 14th century the “Triptych of San Matteo” by Andrea di Cione, the “Polyptych of San Pancrazio” by Bernardo Daddi and the “Presentation to the Temple” by Ambrogio Lorenzetti lead into the collection of international Gothic works. These include “The Adoration of the Magi” by Lorenzo Monaco. Among the artworks of the early Renaissance the “Coronation of the Blessed Virgin” by Beato Angelico, the “Battle of San Romano” by Paolo Uccello, “Portrait of the Dukes of Urbino” by Piero della Francesca and “The Coronation of the Blessed Virgin” by Filippo Lippi. These are followed by the collection of Boticelli masterpieces, including “La calunnia”, “Primavera”, “The Birth of Venus”, “The Adoration of the Magi”, “Madonna della Melagrana”, and “Coronation of the Blessed Virgin”. The Renaissance is celebrated by two magnificent paintings by Leonardo da Vinci, “l'Adorazione dei Magi” and “The “Annunciation” alongside works by Pietro Perugino and Piero di Cosimo. Superb examples of Florentine portraiture from the 16th century include Medici portraits by Pontormo, ‘l'Angiolino musicante’ by Rosso Fiorentino and ‘la Dama col Petrarchino’ by Andrea del Sarto. In a series of adjoining rooms are the works of German art from the 15th and 16th century and paintings from Lombardia and Emilia that evoke mythological tales and detailed Flemish landscapes, including “Adam and Eve” by Lucas Cranach, “Adoration of the Magi” by Andrea Mantegna and “The Blessed Virgin adoring the Child” by Correggio.
artwork: Piero di Cosimo - "Perseus Freeing Andromeda", 1510 or 1513 - Oil on panel - 70 cm × 123 cm. Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence - Part of the famed Uffizi collection.
The second corridor contains Roman statues and portraits under the frescoed vaulted ceilings. The miniatures Cabinet opens off this corridor. The third Corridor contains the 16th century artworks by Michelangelo (“The Tondo Doni”) and Rafael (“Madonna of the Goldfinch” and “Pope Leo X with Cardinals Giulio de' Medici and Luigi de' Rossi”), Titian (“Flora” and “Venus of Urbino), Parmigianino (“The Madonna of the Long Neck”) amongst others. From the 17th century works, highlights include, Peter Paul Rubens (“Judith with the Head of Holofernes”, “Portrait of Isabella Brant”, “Henry IV at the Battle of Ivry”, “Self-Portrait without a Hat” and others), Caravaggio (“The Sacrifice of Isaac” and “Medusa”), Rembrandt Van Rijn (“Self-portrait as a Young Man”, “Self-portrait as an Old Man” and “Portrait of an Old Man”) and views by Canaletto. The Uffizi now houses a huge artistic heritage consisting of thousands of paintings from medieval to modern times, a great number of antique sculptures, illuminations, and tapestries. It is also famous for its collection of self-portraits, which constantly grew through new acquisitions and donations of contemporary artists, as well as for another remarkable collection, that of the Cabinet of Drawings and Prints. Throughout the 19th century, new rooms were opened and the picture gallery continued to expand through the addition of major works including Botticelli's famous The Birth of Venus (acquired in 1815) and Leonardo da Vinci's Annunciation (acquired in 1867). The acquisition of the Primavera, the splendid panel painted by Botticelli around 1482, dates to 1919. The 20th century led to the re-arrangement of the works, on various occasions, much restoration and, in recent times, the definitive arrangement of the Contini Bonacossi collection.
artwork: Giovanni Bellini - Allegoria sacra, circa 1485-1488, tavola.- Firenze, Galleria degli Uffizi. Photo: Gabinetto fotografico Soprintendenza P.S.A.E. e per il Polo Museale della città di Firenze
From March 11th 2011 until June 12th 2011, the Uffizi is hosting “Figure, memory, Space”, a selection of drawings from the 15th century taken equally from the Uffizi and British Museum collections. The exhibition unites two of the most important graphics collections in the world in a partnership symbolically using an identical number of loans from each collection. The intention is to focus on the decades from the start of the fifteenth century to the early years of the sixteenth when drawing established its role as an independent artistic expression. The artists featured are all outstanding and include Florentine and central Italian artists such as Lorenzo Monaco, Beato Angelico, Filippo and Filippino Lippi, the Pollaiolo, Verrocchio, Botticelli, Perugino and Ghirlandaio right through to Leonardo, Raphael and Michelangelo. Alongside these, northern Italian artists represented include Pisanello, Amico Aspertini, the Ferrara school, Jacopo and Gentile Bellini, Mantegna and Titian. Each of them offers their own interpretation of drawing, an intimate expression of their individual draughtsmanship, elaboration of a style, experimentation of a technique and meditation on the subject. In conjunction with this exhibition, in the Reali Poste, the Prints and Drawings Department will be displaying a further selection of fifty drawings, engravings and jewelry, again inspired by the three categories of Figures, Memories and Space. These are works visible only in Florence (the main exhibition had previously been on show at the British Museum), such as Mantegna’s Judith or the small cartoon for the Equestrian Monument to Sir John Hawkwood by Paolo Uccello and two small sketches once attributed to Cimabue, possibly by Giorgio Vasari himself. Finally, in the actual Gallery around twenty paintings by Renaissance artists have been provided with informative panels designed to connect the paintings with the preparatory studies on show in the Reali Poste. The shows are accompanied by two catalogues published by Giunti. The first of these is an Italian version of the preceding English publication, while the second is devoted to the works on display in the Prints and Drawings Department and to issues connected with collecting, taste and the critical reception of fifteenth-century Italian drawings and Florentine prints from Vasari to Berenson.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art opens "Art & Love in Renaissance Italy "
Posted: 23 Dec 2011 07:50 PM PST
artwork: Lorenzo Lotto (Italian, ca. 1480–1556) - Venus and Cupid, late 1520s - Oil on canvas, 92.4 x 111.4 cm. Purchase, Mrs. Charles Wrightsman Gift, in honor of Marietta Tree, 1986 
New York City - Key moments in the lives of Italian men and women in the Renaissance were marked by celebrations carried out with the greatest possible degree of magnificence. Of these, betrothal, marriage, and the birth of a child were of the utmost significance. Art and Love in Renaissance Italy, at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, offers a unique look at approximately 150 art objects and paintings, dating from around 1400 to 1550, that were created to celebrate love and marriage. Exhibition on view 18 November through 16 February, 2009.
Musée Maillol An
Posted: 17 Dec 2011 08:49 PM PST
artwork: The stunning porcelain figure of Hercules is based on the famous Antique sculpture of the Farnese Hercules, now in the Archaeological Museum in Naples.

FLORENCE.- A very rare and important 82 cm. high porcelain figure of Hercules created at the Doccia factory in Tuscany in 1753-55 sold for £657,250 ( $1,020,573 US Dollars) last week in Bonhams Fine European Ceramics auction, setting a new world record price for Doccia porcelain at auction. It was the first time that a Doccia figure of this size had come to auction and the piece far exceeded its pre-sale estimate of £300,000-500,000. The stunning figure of Hercules is based on the famous Antique sculpture of the Farnese Hercules, now in the Archaeological Museum in Naples. The gesso model used in its creation has not moved since the 18th century, and is still kept in the Doccia factory museum. The Doccia factory was founded in the middle of the 18th century by Carlo Ginori, and is still operating in Sesto Fiorentino, just outside of Florence. The factory started making large-scale porcelain figures, a hugely ambitions task, in the late 1740's.

Posted: 17 Dec 2011 07:43 PM PST
artwork: David LaChapelle - "Madonna: Furious Seasons", 2004 - Digital chromogenic print mounted on Diasec - 127 x 152.4 cm. © David LaChapelle. On view at the Hangram Design Museum, Seoul in a David LaChapelle restrospective until February 26th 2012.

Seoul, Korea.- The Seoul Art Center is pleased to announce the retrospective of the acclaimed American artist and photographer David LaChapelle on view through February 26th at the Hangaram Design Museum.  Hugely anticipated, this is LaChapelle’s second Asian museum retrospective after a widely successful reception in Taipei, Taiwan in 2010. With nearly two hundred works, it will present the most comprehensive selection of LaChapelle’s photographic works ever seen in Asia, spanning over twenty years of his artistic career from the 1980s to 2011. LaChapelle is known internationally for his exceptional talent in combining a unique hyper-realistic aesthetic with profound social messages. Alongside his earlier works commissioned for fashion and celebrity editorials, the exhibition will showcase LaChapelle's recent artworks such as The Raft of Illusion, the site-specific installation Chain of Life and his most recent work Gaia.


LaChapelle’s photography career began in the 1980s showing his artwork in New York City galleries. His works caught the eye of Andy Warhol who offered him his first job as a photographer at Interview Magazine. Since then, LaChapelle has worked for the most prestigious international publications such as Italian Vogue, Vanity Fair, GQ and Rolling Stone, photographing personalities as diverse as Madonna, Lance Armstrong, Uma Thurman, Elizabeth Taylor, David Beckham, Leonardo DiCaprio, Hillary Clinton, and Muhammed Ali, to name a few. In 2006, LaChapelle decided to leave the world of publishing and magazines to return to where he started, creating work for exhibitions in museums and galleries around the world. LaChapelle has been the subject of exhibitions in both commercial galleries and leading public institutions around the world. He has had solo museum exhibitions at the Barbican Museum, London (2002), Palazzo Reale Milan (2007), MALBA Museum, Buenos Aires (2007), Museo del Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso, Mexico City (2009), and the Musee de La Monnaie, Paris (2009), among many others. In 2010, he mounted two record-breaking solo shows at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Taipei, Taiwan and the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel. In 2011, he has had a major exhibition of new work at The Lever House, New York, and a retrospective at the Museo Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico (open through March 2012).

artwork: David LaChapell - "The Last Supper", 2003 - Color coupler print - 156.2 x 304.2 cm. © David LaChapelle. On view at the Hangram Design Museum, Seoul - David LaChapelle restrospective until February 26th 2012.


After establishing himself as a fixture in contemporary photography, LaChapelle decided to branch out and direct music videos, live theatrical events, and documentary films. His directing credits include music videos for artists such as Christina Aguilera, Moby, Jennifer Lopez, Britney Spears, The Vines and No Doubt. His stage work includes Elton John’s The Red Piano and the Caesar’s Palace spectacular he designed and directed in 2004. His burgeoning interest in film led him to make the short documentary Krumped, an award-winner at Sundance from which he developed RIZE, the feature film acquired for worldwide distribution by Lion’s Gate Films. The film was released in the US and internationally in the Summer of 2005 to huge critical acclaim, and was chosen to open the 2005 Tribeca Film Festival in New York City.

David LaChapelle continues to be inspired by everything from art history and street culture, to the Hawaiian jungle in which he lives, projecting an image of twenty-first century pop culture through his work that is both loving and critical. He is quite simply the only photographic artist working today who has transitioned flawlessly from the world of fashion and celebrity photography to be enshrined by the notoriously discerning contemporary art intelligentsia.

artwork: David LaChapelle - "The House at the End of the World", 2005 - Digital c-print flush-mounted to acrylic glass - 182.9 x 246 cm. © David LaChapelle. -  On view at the Hangram Design Museum, in Seoul in a David LaChapelle restrospective until February 26th 2012.

The Seoul Arts Center, literally the Hall of Arts, is a cultural center in Seocho-gu, the southern area of Seoul, South Korea. Measuring in 12,0350 m², it consists of many different halls and centers for many diverse art forms. It began construction in 1984, and was fully opened in 1993. It was started with the intention of bringing a more solid aspect to the Korean arts and cultural scene, and to bring the Korean arts to an international level. It consists of the main Festival Hall, Calligraphy Hall, Music Hall, Arts Center, Center of Archives, Education Hall which are all housed indoors, and the Circular Plaza, Street of Meetings, Traditional Korean Gardens, an outdoor Theater, and a market place. The central venue, which is the Opera House, was built basing designs on the traditional hat for Korean men, the "gat", worn during the Joseon Dynasty by grown men who had passed the gwageo. The Music Hall was designed with the idea of a Korean fan in mind. The Hangaram Design Museum within the Seoul Arts Center is sSituated in the east wing of the Center, and opened its doors in 1990. It concentrates on modern and contemporary art enabling younger people to enjoy their visits. Measuring in at 15,434 m², its first and second floors are connected so that major works of art can be displayed without difficulty. The museum uses natural lighting installed in many respectable European art museums to illuminate its art works. Visit the arts center's website at ... www.sac.or.kr/eng
nounces Exhibition of Treasures of the Medicis
Posted: 11 Dec 2011 06:44 PM PST

artwork: Fra Angelico - Sépulture des Saints Côme et Damien, et de leurs trois frères, vers 1438-1440. Détrempe sur bois, 36 x 45 cm. Florence, Museo di San Marco (prédelle) Inv. 1890 n. 8494. - Photo: Archivio fotografico della soprintendenza di Firenze.
PARIS.- Men of wealth and influence, the Medicis were not just Florentine pharmacists enriched by trade who turned into the bankers of Europe, before becoming its princes. Subtle politicians, these business men were above all fervent humanists. Their enlightened patronage revealed a culture as deep as it was widespread from the 15th through the 18th centuries. The family clan, nearly always united — whether in power or removed from it —, never ceased to surround itself with artists, painters, sculptors, jewelers, musicians, poets and scientists, which they protected rather than just commissioning them.

Wishing to renew life via aesthetics and science, the outstanding Florentine family did not quite, in fact, launch the movement of sumptuous patronage that gripped Florence during the Renaissance. But it favored the avant-garde like no other before them, turning art into an extraordinary instrument of power, setting up forever the image of the magnificent patron.

Wherever the Medicis were installed, they reigned more thanks to the splendor of their taste than through the power of their bank. Inventors, in the archeological definition of the word, the Medicis « invented » modern Western art, by encouraging Fra Angelico’s art of perspective and Botticelli’s humanism, by conferring a nobility on Italian language literature, by supporting the early classicism of Michel-Angelo and Raphaël, by displaying Bronzino’s Florentine mannerism, by carrying the minor arts to their apotheosis, by always being at the forefront of new geographic and scientific discoveries, by creating the first operas in history with Peri’s and Caccini’s two “Eurydices”, as well as by underwriting Galileo’s astronomical discoveries.

To find once more the world’s harmonies while pretending to be its organizers, such was the Medicis’ overweening ambition.

A treasury in the musée Maillol
artwork: Agnolo Bronzino (1503-1572) Italy "An Allegory of Venus and Cupid" 1552, Oil on canvasIt was that personal and modern taste for new spaces, whether in the world of decorative arts, in painting, in music, in science or in poetry, that the exhibition « Trésor des Médicis », (The Medicis’ Treasures) emphasizes by regrouping nearly 150 works and objects, all of which were seen, coveted or touched by the magnificent Florentines, since all of them come from the Medici collections. The exhibition in the Musée Maillol invites one to enter into the very heart of the Medici palace, by recalling, among these very rarely loaned masterpieces, a history of the Medici taste, as exemplified over time and with the various heads of the Medici family, through various rooms, whether grandiose or intimate: reception room, studiolo, or cabinet of marvels, workshops for the hard stones, the library , the Medici theatre, a mathematics study-room and the chapel.

From Cosmo to Lorenzo : the glory of the Lords of Florence in the 15th century
If it was Giovanni di Bicci who founded the Medici bank at the very end of the 14th century, it was Cosmo the Elder who marked the advent of the future dynasty by becoming the wealthiest man in Europe. Henceforth, the banker of Popes and of Kings after his return from exile to Florence in 1434, it was the subtle and wise Cosmo, who is at the start of the treasure and of the almost limitless reign of the Medicis. He started by using his considerable financial resources to collect antiques – and even Islamic objects – as was the custom in the leading families during the Renaissance. But he also surrounded himself with works of art of every kind, commissioning the most adventurous artists like Fra Angelico, as is clear from a predella panel representing sepulchers of the Saints Cosmo and Damian. His grandson, Lorenzo the Magnificent , a talented poet and subtle political strategist, even if an ineffectual banker, became « the first citizen of Florence » without bearing that title. He carried that « Republic of the Arts» to its first peak. Lorenzo devoted outlandish sums to purchasing hard-stone vases and admitted to a passion for antique cameos, like that of Poseidon and Athena, then attributed to Pyrgotele, the only artist allowed by Alexander the Great to engrave his portrait.

It was the Magnificent who invited the young Michelangelo to share his table and to sculpt in the garden in San Marco. He also corresponded with Amerigo Vespucci, the sailor who gave his name to America, and he collected exotic objects, like Chinese celadons.

Lorenzo also believed in Botticelli’s brilliant talent : employing an exacerbated chromatism In revolutionary Adoration of the Magi, Sandro did not hesitate to position, no longer in a family chapel, but this time in the heart of Florence, the Medici family in its entirety, Cosmo the Elder, Piero the First, Lorenzo and Julian de Medici, surrounded by their court, headed by Pic de la Mirandole and Politian, like the Muses gathered together around a new Apollonian Holy Family.

The irruption of Charles VIII’s French troops put a temporary end to the absolute power of the Medicis and to their aesthetic ascendancy: their palace in the Larga — which Apollonio di Giovanni did not hesitate to represent as Priam’s palace in an illuminated manuscript devoted to Virgil — was wrecked, their collections sold at auction. By conferring on Alexander de Medici the title of duke in 1532, Charles the Fifth restored the absolute power of the family over Florence.

artwork: Raphael - Portrait de Tommaso Inghirami dit Fedra Inghirami, c. 1510. Huile sur toile, 62,3 x 89,5 cm. Florence, Galleria Palatina. Photo: Archivio fotografico della soprintendenza di Firenze.From Rome to Paris : two Popes for two queens
An aesthete and a cultured man , John de Medici, second son of Lorenzo, became Pope under the name of Leo X, and he did his best to buy back many of the goods that had been scattered. He provided the Medicis’ patronage with a new Roman dimension, henceforth considering Florence as his private property, even sending there, with some arrogance, a rebellious Michelangelo.

A great organizer of festivities and a great collector of manuscripts, Leo X, following the example of the Magnificent, turned Rome into a paradise for artists and intellectuals. As well as Pontormo and Andrea del Sarto, he overburdened Raphaël with work.

A new visual acuity, almost Flemish in its hyperrealism, appeared in 1515 in the outstanding «Portrait of Tommaso Inghirami », Leo X’s librarian, completely dressed in a symphonic red, casting his eyes heavenwards. Gazing in awe at that painting, Bonaparte and his followers did not hesitate to borrow it momentarily from the Medici collections. Julius de Medici, illegitimate son of Julian, Lorenzo’s brother, became Pope in his turn, after his cousin Leo X, under the name Clement VII. If that tragic Pope saw the sacking of Rome and the break with Henry VIII of England, he nonetheless remained a sensitive patron.

Popes behaving like kings, the Medicis undertook a far-seeing matrimonial policy, which led two women to the throne of France. Placed under the direct protection of Clement VII, Catherine de Medici married the future king Henri II in 1533, bringing with her a dowry of 28000 écus in jewelry. Very attentive to art forms, the new queen was above all very fond of portraits : she gathered together over 700, including a portrait of herself that she sent to Florence, as a dowry for her grand-daughter Christine de Lorraine.

A gifted draughtswoman, an outstanding ballet dancer, fascinated by jewelry and endowed with a huge fortune, Marie de Medici, daughter of Francis the First, Grand Duke of Tuscany, in her turn married the king of France Henri IV in 1600. Her marriage having inspired the birth of the opera in Florence, she begged her uncle Ferdinand de Medici to allow the composer Giulio Caccini to come to Paris with his daughter Francesca, a singer but also a composer. She loved to call upon the baroque opulence of two Flemish artists, Frans Pourbus, who painted her portrait wearing all her pearls , and Rubens, who had attended her wedding in Florence.

From Cosmo II to Cosmo III : the twilight of the Medicean starts in the 17th and 18th centuries
Open minded and curious – maybe because he benefited from having had Galileo as a tutor -, Cosmo II, during his brief reign at the very start of the 17th century , put up new buildings to receive more and more important collections. If he provided the minor arts with a new impulse, he was the only one in Florence to encourage the Caravegesque realism that had come to light in Rome and in Naples.

Cosmo II also encouraged his brother, cardinal Leopold de Medici, in his initiative of collecting self-portraits by prestigious artists in the Vasari corridor — self-portraits signed Luca Giordano or Carlo Dolci— or his re-organisation of the Palatine Library and of its 14000 manuscripts and 20 000 printed volumes. The Grand-Duke also supported his brother in his creation in 1657 of the Academia del Cimento (Academy for experimentation), which promoted Galileo’s experimental science.

An important collector of scientific instruments and of weapons, his son the Grand Duke Ferdinand II was opposed to the Holy See’s decree which had obliged Galileo to retract his Copernican discoveries before the Inquisition. The Medicis, godfathers of the Renaissance, were also the forebears of the Century of Enlightenment. The last descendant of the Medicis, prince Jean-Gaston remembered that, who undertook, 95 years after the astronomer’s death, to provide a tomb for Galileo in Florence, picking up along the way two of the great man’s fingers to enclose them inside a henceforth sacred reliquary: the genius’ finger points to the Medicis.

Leaving Florence and enjoying, in his villa in Poggio in Caiano, at the heart of his Gabinetto, the contemplation « of small works by all the most famous painters!», he had a theatre built in another villa in Pratolino, where he supported the new aesthetic concept of baroque opera embodied by Alessandro Scarlatti. He died of syphilis and madness in 1713 aged 50, without having ever reigned. Libertine and liberal unlike the rigid Cosmo III, but drunk and nearly always in bed, living confined to his apartments while carrying out a ceaseless and melancholy debauchery, his young brother, Jean-Gaston de Medici marked the end of the dynasty in the night.

On his death in 1737, without successors, the Grand-Duchy left the Medici family to return into the demesne of Lorraine and of the future Emperor of the Holy Roman German Empire, Francis Ist of Austria. The last survivor of the line, Jean-Gaston’s sister, Anne-Marie Louise, princess Palatine – whose jewel in the shape of a cradle offered by her husband on hearing of her long awaited pregnancy , was not sufficient to give him a living heir – handed over all the Medici collections to the city of Florence, so they could remain « at the disposal of all nations». A testament of gold and fire, a fantastic spectacle of works and masterpieces which relate the world’s beauty, a world re-organized for the mind and feelings of the Medici family.
artwork: ART, even for those who make it and love it, is always a question, a problem for itself. What is art? The question must arise, but it allows no definitive answer. for these reasons, neuroscience, which looks at events in the brains of individual people and can do no more than describe and analyze them, may just be the wrong kind of empirical science for truly understanding art.
Posted: 10 Dec 2011 07:09 PM PST
artwork: Silen und Hermaphrodit, Marble; Height : 90,6 cm; Skulpturensammlung; Foto: Klut/ Estel © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden
Dresden, Germany - Two of the oldest collections of antiquities outside Italy have been brought together in a spectacular exhibition: classical sculptures from the Museo Nacional del Prado go on display alongside works from Dresden’s Skulpturensammlung. Both collections have their roots in Rome, are similar in the diversity of their holdings and incorporate major works of classical sculpture. During the Baroque era, they were prized as particularly valuable objects and displayed in the palaces of papal families in Rome. King Philip V acquired antiquities from the collection of Livio Odescalchi for Madrid in 1724. In 1728 August the Strong succeeded in purchasing sculptures from the Albani and Chigi collections.

Posted: 10 Dec 2011 07:08 PM PST
artwork: Umberto Boccioni - "Unique Forms of Continuity in Space", 1913, cast 1972 - © Tate. Photo: Tate Photography
LONDON.- The Tate Modern presents today Futurism, on view through September 20, 2009. This exhibition will be the first large-scale showing of Futurism in Britain in thirty years. The movement set out to modernise Italian art and social attitudes and its influence spread across Europe and beyond, revolutionising the response to the dynamism of modern life. Its master of ceremonies was the poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti and this exhibition celebrates the centenary of his publication of The Founding and First Manifesto of Futurism in 1909. Artists who will feature include Umberto Boccioni, Gino Severini, Carlo Carrà, Luigi Russolo, Giacomo Balla, Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Sonia Delaunay, Robert Delaunay, Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Natalya Goncharova, Liubov Popova, David Bomberg, Wyndham Lewis, C.R.W. Nevinson and Jacob Epstein.

Posted: 10 Dec 2011 07:07 PM PST
artwork: Indian-born British sculptor Anish Kapoor next to his artwork 'Untitled' (2008) on display at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain. The Guggenheim Museum presents 20 artworks during an exhibition devoted to the art of Anish Kapoor. EPA/Alfredo Aldlai
BILBAO, SPAIN - The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao presents the first large-scale solo exhibition in Spain dedicated to the work of Anish Kapoor. Over the past thirty years, Kapoor has gained international acclaim as one of the most influential and significant artists of his generation. His exploration of form and space and his use of color and material have profoundly influenced the course of contemporary sculpture. Organized by the Royal Academy of Arts in London and the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, the exhibition, conceived and installed in close collaboration with the artist, offers insight into Kapoor’s working method and creative process, and includes twenty major works from several series spanning the 1970s to the present. On view from 16 March to 12 October 2010.

New York City (New York Times).- What is art? What does art reveal about human nature? The trend these days is to approach such questions in the key of neuroscience. “Neuroaesthetics” is a term that has been coined to refer to the project of studying art using the methods of neuroscience. It would be fair to say that neuroaesthetics has become a hot field. It is not unusual for leading scientists and distinguished theorists of art to collaborate on papers that find their way into top scientific journals. Semir Zeki, a neuroscientist at University College London, likes to say that art is governed by the laws of the brain. It is brains, he says, that see art and it is brains that make art.


Champions of the new brain-based approach to art sometimes think of themselves as fighting a battle with scholars in the humanities who may lack the courage (in the words of the art historian John Onians) to acknowledge the ways in which biology constrains cultural activity. Strikingly, it hasn’t been much of a battle. Students of culture, like so many of us, seem all too glad to join in the general enthusiasm for neural approaches to just about everything. What is striking about neuroaesthetics is not so much the fact that it has failed to produce interesting or surprising results about art, but rather the fact that no one — not the scientists, and not the artists and art historians — seem to have minded, or even noticed. What stands in the way of success in this new field is, first, the fact that neuroscience has yet to frame anything like an adequate biological or “naturalistic” account of human experience — of thought, perception, or consciousness.artwork: ART, even for those who make it and love it, is always a question, a problem for itself. What is art? The question must arise, but it allows no definitive answer. for these reasons, neuroscience, which looks at events in the brains of individual people and can do no more than describe and analyze them, may just be the wrong kind of empirical science for truly understanding art.

New York City (New York Times).- What is art? What does art reveal about human nature? The trend these days is to approach such questions in the key of neuroscience. “Neuroaesthetics” is a term that has been coined to refer to the project of studying art using the methods of neuroscience. It would be fair to say that neuroaesthetics has become a hot field. It is not unusual for leading scientists and distinguished theorists of art to collaborate on papers that find their way into top scientific journals. Semir Zeki, a neuroscientist at University College London, likes to say that art is governed by the laws of the brain. It is brains, he says, that see art and it is brains that make art.


Champions of the new brain-based approach to art sometimes think of themselves as fighting a battle with scholars in the humanities who may lack the courage (in the words of the art historian John Onians) to acknowledge the ways in which biology constrains cultural activity. Strikingly, it hasn’t been much of a battle. Students of culture, like so many of us, seem all too glad to join in the general enthusiasm for neural approaches to just about everything. What is striking about neuroaesthetics is not so much the fact that it has failed to produce interesting or surprising results about art, but rather the fact that no one — not the scientists, and not the artists and art historians — seem to have minded, or even noticed. What stands in the way of success in this new field is, first, the fact that neuroscience has yet to frame anything like an adequate biological or “naturalistic” account of human experience — of thought, perception, or consciousness.
Posted: 03 Dec 2011 09:28 PM PST
artwork: Unknown German artist (After William Hogarth) - "A Midnight Modern Conversation", late 18th century - Oil on canvas - 78 x 105.5 cm. Collection of the Art Museum of Estonia – Mikkel Museum. On view in "Vinum & Panis" until March 11th 2012.

Tallinn, Estonia.- The Kumu Art Museum is pleased to present "Vinum & Panis: The Bread and Wine Motif in the Art of the 16th to 20 Centuries", on view at the museum through March 11th 2012. Produced in cooperation with several Estonian museums and the Estonian Evangelical Lutheran Church, the exhibition explores the different meanings of bread and wine throughout the last 500 years, as seen by the artists of the time. The exhibition explores the meanings of two of the most important Christian and pagan subjects – wine and bread – through works of applied and fine arts, manuscripts and books, ethnographic items and archaeological finds, as well as in historical photos.

Posted: 03 Dec 2011 09:28 PM PST
artwork: Unknown German artist (After William Hogarth) - "A Midnight Modern Conversation", late 18th century - Oil on canvas - 78 x 105.5 cm. Collection of the Art Museum of Estonia – Mikkel Museum. On view in "Vinum & Panis" until March 11th 2012.

Tallinn, Estonia.- The Kumu Art Museum is pleased to present "Vinum & Panis: The Bread and Wine Motif in the Art of the 16th to 20 Centuries", on view at the museum through March 11th 2012. Produced in cooperation with several Estonian museums and the Estonian Evangelical Lutheran Church, the exhibition explores the different meanings of bread and wine throughout the last 500 years, as seen by the artists of the time. The exhibition explores the meanings of two of the most important Christian and pagan subjects – wine and bread – through works of applied and fine arts, manuscripts and books, ethnographic items and archaeological finds, as well as in historical photos.
Posted: 23 Nov 2011 05:41 PM PST
artwork: Marjorie Schick -  “Chopines and Puddles” - Painted wood, plastic, and papier maché. - Image courtesy of © the artist. On view at Boise Art Museum in "The Perfect Fit: Shoes Tell Stories" until July 31st.

Boise, ID.- Inspiring, vibrant and fun, "The Perfect Fit: Shoes Tell Stories" explores the meanings of shoes, presenting 120 playful, imaginative and provocative objects.  Shoes speak to style, fashion and individuality, yet they also tell stories, expressing more than just their role as footwear. Shoes reflect the time and place of their creation, providing unique insights into human history and identity. The 100 contemporary artists from the USA, Canada and Israel whose shoe-inspired artworks are presented in "The Perfect Fit " are motivated by these themes, creating objects of wit, whimsy and visual pizzazz. "The Perfect Fit: Shoes Tell Stories" can be seen at the Boise Art Museum in Idaho until July 31st. “The Perfect Fit: Shoes Tell Stories” was organized by the Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton, Massachussets and curated by Wendy Tarlow Kaplan. There are 120 shoe-related objects created by over 100 artists from across the US, plus Canada and Israel.


artwork: Rebecca Siemering - "Super7Hot!", 2008 Found scratch tickets, dental floss, canvas, cardboard and velvet - 20.5" x 4.25” x 8.5”. Image courtesy of © the artist.Artists featured in the exhibition include, Lynne Allen, Michael Boroniec, Ali Cann-Clift, James Ellis Coleman, Patricia Delaney, Marina Dempster, Nina Fletcher, Judy Haberl, Jan Hopkins, Ken Hruby, Sergei Isupov, Silas Kopf, Diane Lamb-Wanucha, David Lang, Marga Lianko, Laurie Miles, Gwen Murphy, Marilyn Pappas, Paula Rasmus-Dede, Beverly Rippel, Marjorie Schick, Diana (Micki) Shampang-Voorhies, Rebecca Siemering, Jessica Straus, M.L. Van Nice, Lois Tarlow, and Nicole Tourangeau. Wendy Tarlow Kaplan, who curated the show, is an independent curator whose family has strong ties to Massachussets' legendary shoe manufacturing industry. This exhibition does not just pay an artistic homage to footwear, many of these works also have a political purpose, speaking as they do to issues of gender, sexuality, race and class. Diana (Micki) Shampang-Voorhies’ "Red Steel Hi-heels" appear to be a sporty new spin on the femme-fatale stiletto with their flowers and autopaint red finish, however, with soles made out of scrap steel and drill-bit heels, they could never be worn, and instead make a statement about the aspirations of those who would wear such shoes.

"Tolerance" by Jan Hopkins crafted from grapefruit and cantaloupe peels and waxed linen, sports text saying “Judge her when you've walked in her shoes." The artist made the piece to honor a divorced soccer mom who became an exotic dancer to pay the bills. Marjorie Schick’s "Chopines and Puddles" pay tribute to a fantastical world of circus-inspired fun, with bright shiny colors and puddle-like bottoms that hug the platform’s soles. Constructed from painted wood, plastic, and papier maché, this carnivalesque footwear is actually modeled after a true-to-life platform shoe that was popular in Venice and England in the late 16th century. The exhibition also features installations, paintings and other artwork.

The Boise Art Museum (BAM) is the only AAM accredited art museum in the State of Idaho. It began in 1931 as the Boise Art Association when a group of thirty people interested in promoting art in the city of Boise and throughout the state met in the Crystal Lounge of the Hotel Boise. Their purpose was to organize an association whose duties were to acquire and maintain a suitable gallery, hosting traveling exhibitions and promoting fine art in Boise. Their first official exhibition was held at the Hotel Boise. In 1937, the Association’s goals were realized through a partnership among the Boise Art Association, the City of Boise and the federal Works Progress Administration. The Boise Gallery of Art was constructed in Julia Davis Park in the heart of downtown Boise. Exclusively managed by volunteers from the Boise Art Association, the 3,000 sq. ft. Art Deco building was composed of two galleries and a small office/lobby space. Although the gallery did not actively collect, it presented local and regional artwork and played an important role in Boise’s growing community. In 1961, the Boise Art Association incorporated as a non-profit organization under the name Boise Gallery of Art.

artwork: Marina Dempster - "Ebullient", 2008 - Found shoe, bees wax, pine resin, glass seed beads and feathers. Image courtesy of © the artist.

In the mid-sixties, the first professional staff was hired and programming became more ambitious. The need for additional space quickly became a priority, and in 1972, the gallery moved to a temporary location as construction began on a year-long expansion program. The 10,000 sq. ft. addition included enlarged galleries, a lobby, sales shop, vault and studio space, allowing the institution to lay the foundation for its current mission, Permanent Collection, exhibition practices and educational programs, including a docent program. In 1986, the institution successfully completed a second renovation, expansion of its galleries, and support of its new facilities. Upon completion of the expansion in 1988, the Museum was awarded its initial accreditation by the American Association of Museums, with subsequent accreditation awarded in 1996. That same year, 1988, the Museum was renamed Boise Art Museum to reflect its focus on developing its Permanent Collection and education program as well as the display of significant traveling exhibitions.

In 1997, BAM embarked upon a multi-million dollar campaign, supported by the City of Boise and the community, which enabled BAM to increase its facilities by 13,800 square feet to a total of 34,800 square feet. This most recent expansion reflects the Museum’s dedication to its Permanent Collection, display of multiple exhibitions, and educational programming. The Museum added five more galleries devoted to the display of its Permanent Collection, a 2,775 square foot sculpture court; an education wing comprised of three studios and an interactive children’s gallery; art storage vault, art prep area, and staff offices. Visit the museum's website at ... http://boiseartmuseum.org
Posted: 23 Nov 2011 05:41 PM PST
artwork: Marjorie Schick -  “Chopines and Puddles” - Painted wood, plastic, and papier maché. - Image courtesy of © the artist. On view at Boise Art Museum in "The Perfect Fit: Shoes Tell Stories" until July 31st.

Boise, ID.- Inspiring, vibrant and fun, "The Perfect Fit: Shoes Tell Stories" explores the meanings of shoes, presenting 120 playful, imaginative and provocative objects.  Shoes speak to style, fashion and individuality, yet they also tell stories, expressing more than just their role as footwear. Shoes reflect the time and place of their creation, providing unique insights into human history and identity. The 100 contemporary artists from the USA, Canada and Israel whose shoe-inspired artworks are presented in "The Perfect Fit " are motivated by these themes, creating objects of wit, whimsy and visual pizzazz. "The Perfect Fit: Shoes Tell Stories" can be seen at the Boise Art Museum in Idaho until July 31st. “The Perfect Fit: Shoes Tell Stories” was organized by the Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton, Massachussets and curated by Wendy Tarlow Kaplan. There are 120 shoe-related objects created by over 100 artists from across the US, plus Canada and Israel.


artwork: Rebecca Siemering - "Super7Hot!", 2008 Found scratch tickets, dental floss, canvas, cardboard and velvet - 20.5" x 4.25” x 8.5”. Image courtesy of © the artist.Artists featured in the exhibition include, Lynne Allen, Michael Boroniec, Ali Cann-Clift, James Ellis Coleman, Patricia Delaney, Marina Dempster, Nina Fletcher, Judy Haberl, Jan Hopkins, Ken Hruby, Sergei Isupov, Silas Kopf, Diane Lamb-Wanucha, David Lang, Marga Lianko, Laurie Miles, Gwen Murphy, Marilyn Pappas, Paula Rasmus-Dede, Beverly Rippel, Marjorie Schick, Diana (Micki) Shampang-Voorhies, Rebecca Siemering, Jessica Straus, M.L. Van Nice, Lois Tarlow, and Nicole Tourangeau. Wendy Tarlow Kaplan, who curated the show, is an independent curator whose family has strong ties to Massachussets' legendary shoe manufacturing industry. This exhibition does not just pay an artistic homage to footwear, many of these works also have a political purpose, speaking as they do to issues of gender, sexuality, race and class. Diana (Micki) Shampang-Voorhies’ "Red Steel Hi-heels" appear to be a sporty new spin on the femme-fatale stiletto with their flowers and autopaint red finish, however, with soles made out of scrap steel and drill-bit heels, they could never be worn, and instead make a statement about the aspirations of those who would wear such shoes.

"Tolerance" by Jan Hopkins crafted from grapefruit and cantaloupe peels and waxed linen, sports text saying “Judge her when you've walked in her shoes." The artist made the piece to honor a divorced soccer mom who became an exotic dancer to pay the bills. Marjorie Schick’s "Chopines and Puddles" pay tribute to a fantastical world of circus-inspired fun, with bright shiny colors and puddle-like bottoms that hug the platform’s soles. Constructed from painted wood, plastic, and papier maché, this carnivalesque footwear is actually modeled after a true-to-life platform shoe that was popular in Venice and England in the late 16th century. The exhibition also features installations, paintings and other artwork.

The Boise Art Museum (BAM) is the only AAM accredited art museum in the State of Idaho. It began in 1931 as the Boise Art Association when a group of thirty people interested in promoting art in the city of Boise and throughout the state met in the Crystal Lounge of the Hotel Boise. Their purpose was to organize an association whose duties were to acquire and maintain a suitable gallery, hosting traveling exhibitions and promoting fine art in Boise. Their first official exhibition was held at the Hotel Boise. In 1937, the Association’s goals were realized through a partnership among the Boise Art Association, the City of Boise and the federal Works Progress Administration. The Boise Gallery of Art was constructed in Julia Davis Park in the heart of downtown Boise. Exclusively managed by volunteers from the Boise Art Association, the 3,000 sq. ft. Art Deco building was composed of two galleries and a small office/lobby space. Although the gallery did not actively collect, it presented local and regional artwork and played an important role in Boise’s growing community. In 1961, the Boise Art Association incorporated as a non-profit organization under the name Boise Gallery of Art.

artwork: Marina Dempster - "Ebullient", 2008 - Found shoe, bees wax, pine resin, glass seed beads and feathers. Image courtesy of © the artist.

In the mid-sixties, the first professional staff was hired and programming became more ambitious. The need for additional space quickly became a priority, and in 1972, the gallery moved to a temporary location as construction began on a year-long expansion program. The 10,000 sq. ft. addition included enlarged galleries, a lobby, sales shop, vault and studio space, allowing the institution to lay the foundation for its current mission, Permanent Collection, exhibition practices and educational programs, including a docent program. In 1986, the institution successfully completed a second renovation, expansion of its galleries, and support of its new facilities. Upon completion of the expansion in 1988, the Museum was awarded its initial accreditation by the American Association of Museums, with subsequent accreditation awarded in 1996. That same year, 1988, the Museum was renamed Boise Art Museum to reflect its focus on developing its Permanent Collection and education program as well as the display of significant traveling exhibitions.

In 1997, BAM embarked upon a multi-million dollar campaign, supported by the City of Boise and the community, which enabled BAM to increase its facilities by 13,800 square feet to a total of 34,800 square feet. This most recent expansion reflects the Museum’s dedication to its Permanent Collection, display of multiple exhibitions, and educational programming. The Museum added five more galleries devoted to the display of its Permanent Collection, a 2,775 square foot sculpture court; an education wing comprised of three studios and an interactive children’s gallery; art storage vault, art prep area, and staff offices. Visit the museum's website at ... http://boiseartmuseum.org

A New Antony Gormley Sculpture "Transport" Unveiled at Canterbury Cathedral

artwork: Antony Gormley sculpture in Canterbury Cathedral's twelfth century crypt. In a career spanning nearly 40 years Antony Gormley has made sculpture that explores the relation of the human body to space at large. He was awarded the Turner Prize in 1994


KENT, UK - "TRANSPORT" a new sculpture created by the artist Antony Gormley was unveiled at Canterbury Cathedral. Antony Gormley is credited with a radical re-investigation of the body as a zone of memory and transformation. The two metre long work uses hand made antique iron nails from the Cathedral’s repaired south east transept roof to construct a delicate filter-like membrane outlining the space of a floating body. The membrane is pierced with nails passing through it from inside to outside and vice versa. The work is suspended above the site of Thomas Becket’s vestry place in the Eastern Crypt of the Cathedral.
Speaking about TRANSPORT Antony Gormley said, “The body is less a thing than a place; a location where things happen. Thought, feeling, memory and anticipation filter through it sometimes staying but mostly passing on, like us in this great cathedral with its centuries of building, adaptation, extension and all the thoughts, feelings and prayers that people have had and transmitted here. Mind and body, church and state are polarities evoked by the life and death of Thomas Becket. We are all the temporary inhabitants of a body, it is our house, instrument and medium; through it all impressions of the world come and from it all our acts, thoughts and feelings are communicated, I hope to have evoked this in the most direct way possible”.

Speaking of the Cathedral’s excitement The Dean of Canterbury, the Very Revd Robert Willis said “It is very thrilling for all of us here at Canterbury Cathedral that Antony Gormley has taken the old nails from the roof which was being restored and from them created the statue TRANSPORT. The sense of passage which the word TRANSPORT conveys tunes well with the constant movement of people through this place of prayer and creativity. It also suggests the way in which sacred spaces communicate a sense of time and eternity, of the finite and the infinite. We are hugely grateful for this work.”

In a career spanning nearly 40 years Antony Gormley has made sculpture that explores the relation of the human body to space at Large. He was awarded the Turner Prize in 1994, the South Bank Prize for Visual Art in 1999 and the Bernhard Heiliger Award for Sculpture in 2007. He was made an Officer of the British Empire (OBE) in 1997 and is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects, Trinity College, Cambridge and Jesus College,Cambridge. He has been a Royal Academician since 2003 and a British Museum Trustee since 2007.

Florence

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 Fornasetti tie  on my silk, sofa  by Carolyn Quartermain.com

































One of my great passions in life is ART in all its forms . I have lingered many hours in galleries and museums, gazing upon works by Grayson Perry,Donatello,Kandinsky,Filippo Lippi, Francis Bacon,Brancusi,Klimt , Michael Parkes, Vincent,etc etc and the members of the P.R.B.
(The Pre Raphaelite Brotherhood) Today I m posting a couple of paintings by Sir Edward Coley Burne Jones, of whom Im particularly fond.You will find the majestic golden staircase at the Victoria and Albert Museum in Kensington London 

and the charming young boy is in my bathroom!
 Do you have favourite artists?..................


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